Archive Page 2

15
Jan
08

How do you language a hyperlink?

I’m going to use this space here tonight to try and think through another kind of writing I’m doing in my thesis, so bear with me. Any comments, advice, encouragment, and/or ways to procrastinate are welcome. Who knows, maybe you and this blog will make it into my thesis in my ‘reflection on methodology and my own changing literac(ies)’ chapter….! 

Michael Wesch’s video “The Machine is Us/Ing Us” 2007

An ecologist explores how writers interact to form systems: all the characteristics of any individual writer or piece of writing both determine and are determined by the characteristics of all the other writers and writings in the systems.”  ~Marilyn Cooper, 1984 in “Writing as Social Action”

The Perpetual Beta Internet software is not a static artifact but rather a process of engagement with users. Users are treated as co-developers and the software is developed continuously and out in the open. Companies thus harness the “collective intelligence” of the web users to make sure their software gets better each time it is used. ~ Summary of Tim O’Reily’s defintion of Web 2.0 2005 and 2006

So here’s my conundrum: I have this section of my Master’s thesis that I am working on that simply won’t be written. I don’t mean I can’t write it, in that I don’t want to or have writers block. I’ve been there and this is totally different. It simply won’t be written. I mean written, in this case, in a traditional linear form with claims and evidence and analysis, with citations as flashpoints and my own “creative” act as the primary force. The part that won’t be written is part of an attempt to define web 2.0 within my project, but not only to define it, but to bring together different disciplinary ways of knowing and understanding web 2.0, not to mention different modes and platforms in which these ways of knowing are articulated. I’ve got a scholarly text written in 1984 by a composition scholar, 2 blogs written by Tim O’Reilly  from 2005 and 2006 respectively, and a 2007 YouTube video by an anthropology professor. Up to this point my way of writing has been a nearly simultaneous act of data collection, connection, questions, and articulations of claims that has somehow worked together to get me 45 pages of semi-polished draft and about 100 pages of notes/fragments/nodes/lists of questions/notices/reflections/freewrites. For these 45 pages the method has worked. For these pages that refuse to be written it hasn’t.

I’ve realized that at least part of my struggle here has to do with the fact that I’m limited by the word-processing page that I’m constrained to. I need hyperlinks, I need images, I need contigent and fluid meanings. I need the ability to show the reader the connections that I am making are tentative, contigent, and ultimately situated with my way of reading these texts since for every 1 thing that my connection articulates, it obscures or elides 2 others. I’ve got a mind map of circles and arrows and phrases that visually shows what I want to say. But what the work of a scholarly thesis demands of me seems at odds with this portion of my project. (For instance, I can only use one font in the body of my text, per graduate school guidelines.) So how to work around all this? I need to language these tentative and contigent connections. I need to language a hyperlink. I need to language my choice and arrangement of data without necessarily unpacking or explaining the data in the way a traditional essayist mode would expect. What this also means is that this section cannot be exactly a part of my thesis – it must be an inserted gif file, named and titled as a “Figure” as if this section of work itself were not my own but a citation. Maybe that’s appropriate, since with this chunk the point is not the creative work I am doing but the connections I am drawing. I have to further fragment texts that are already fragmented and put them back together without precluding other connections. Each fragment needs to be inserted into a “web of connotations and codes” as Johndan Johnson- Eilola puts it. I need to draw attention to the fact that, according to articulation theory, each of these fragments means not automatically but because of what it is connected to. The work, then, needs to not only reveal what my position in rhet/comp makes into the contigent meaning, but to perform that contigent meaning as well. The pieces above are just one example of the fragments of works I need to reconfigure and link. What’s missing is the link. But how do I language a link?

OK, so maybe all of this has really been dancing around the real question. Maybe the problem is not the languaging of the link, instantiating the connection between fragments, but in justifying doing this at all. I suppose I have the sense that I need to defend my reasoning behind this approach. The discourse — despite our professed comfort, acceptance, and even enthusiasm for a pomo sensibility — still seems to privelege the linear text with a strong authorial voice, to privelege the act of composing over the act of connecting. That’s not wholly fair, of course, we’re not a bunch of ostrichs with our heads in the sand (at least not here at Western). But still, every text I’ve read that does something different has to explain how and why. However you cut it, its justification. So what’s my justification?

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15
Jan
08

Delurking is delightful…

So apparently last week was National De-Lurking week. Who declared it such, I dunno. But sounds like a good idea. I’ve learned today in face-to-face conversation with friends/colleagues that I have a number of lurkers who, for whatever reason, have not commented. No problem. After all, just taking the time to read is great and I appreciate it. But please, feel free to comment – anything. Or just add to my collection of wierd or bizarre YouTube videos. That’s fine, too.  So…

Join Fluffy here and leave a note. 🙂
(Fluffy is a homage to Cathy. Although someday I’ll have a kitty to blog with I don’t currently so for now Fluffy – my virtual cat that I borrowed from another blogger – will have to do).

14
Jan
08

Just because I can…

Make sure that you turn on the sound…

It gets more hilarious everytime I watch it! If nothing else, my English 101 students are fabulous resources for adding to my growing collection of YouTube vids.

12
Jan
08

What’s my Blog About?

The answer: I dunno. I had one person ask me yesterday, isn’t a blog supposed to be “about” something? Maybe. Is it? I was talking to a new student yesterday as well who wants to start up her own political blog. But it seems as if, with the ones that I read they’re about all sorts of things….a wierd mish-mash of personal journal (whatcha been up to?) internet surfing, and with the academic ones I read – research and scholarly interests. So what is mine about? I had originally intended it to be a place that I noted thoughts about stuff that I was reading….hence the title with “Bookworm.” But I quickly realized (as in, within hours) that such a theme simply wouldn’t work. What I found myself wanting to blog about was whatever stuff was running through my head. Sometimes what I read, yes, but often not. Then I realized, if blogging is writing and with other kinds of writing I don’t know what I want to say until I say it, how can I possibly know what I want to blog about? What I concluded then was that this blog, at least at this point, will be a wierd mish-mash of anything and everything. What it may become I don’t know. So there’s my disclaimer: my blog isn’t ABOUT anything so I have no idea what may show up here. Hope that any readers lurking out there are OK with that, too. (And thanks to the person who raised the question!) 🙂

11
Jan
08

The official photographer of the family is…

pc280076.jpg

When my aunt, uncle, and cousin Joy and her kids were visiting after Christmas we went to visit our grandparents (both of whom are over 90). Joy’s daughter Ashley, who is 5 years old, took this candid photo of myself, Joy, Grandma, and the back of Joy’s son James. What amazes me is the photos that Ashley can take! She doesn’t take random shots that cut off heads or other random body parts but she always composes her shots (“Aunt Mandy get closer to Mommy”). More than that  the phots she takes are often among the best photos of people and her candid shots – like this one – are wonderful. That look on Joy’s face is a totally characteristic expression (it conjures up the laugh that goes along with it) and even Grandma looks engaged (most of the time she isn’t.) If she lived closer I think I’d make Ash my official event photographer.

By the by, in case you’re wondering, the picture in the background is me at about 3. Grandma has always adored it because she thinks I’m praying. It was only recently that I finally told her that actually that was my pouty-face. She was non-plussed; a benefit of being 90 and having dementia, I suppose. 🙂

08
Jan
08

Human Tetris

I recently saw a snippet of a program on the the Discovery Channel about the History of Videogames  and a portion of it was dedicated to discussing the phenomenon of Tetris. One of the things that the program touched upon was the way that Tetris simply messes with your mind (my words, of course, not theirs).  One of the participants interviewed talked about dreaming in Tetris and about seeing all the objects around him in regards to their spatial configurations. How could he get X object to fit around Y object? While I have to admit I have never gone so far as to want to play Tetris with my living room furniture, I’ve dreamed in Tetris. I always thought it was because I am simply WAY to intense with videogames of all kinds to the extent that I have mostly ceased to play them. But turns out it may not just be me….seems like Tetris really does do strange and unexpected things to the way that one’s brain conceives the world. But why Tetris? After all, when I played Mario Brothers all the time at about the age of twelve it wasn’t as if I was searching out coins or power-ups in my sleep…

So anyway, here is this artist who is making videos that mimic Tetris but uses people. Strikes me as a little disturbing but then again, it may be a pretty savvy commentary on how we behave in set patterns I’m thinking about how how my students will come into the classroom and always sit in the same spot in the relation to the way the room is laid out. Either way I always find it so interesting when these pivotal pieces of pop culture get remade.